Welcome, Guest

Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10
1
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Giving Honey to Toddlers
« Last post by Acebird on Today at 05:28:17 PM »
They keep pushing it out with no research to back it up that I've been able to find.
It is kinda hard to do research using children in the study because it is illegal unless the child has a terminal illness.  Surely each child will be different.  I would suggest that those that are breast fed will get the immunity sooner.  I would guess that botulism does happen in some children without knowing the source.  I would not be in a hurry to give my children honey because of the rotting of the developing teeth.
2
Crazy talk,
They may have ran out of low end boxes and sent you what they had on hand.

Or old inventory of the higher quality, returns, imperfections, something like that.  Budget boxes definitely has knots.

It's totally possible that I got better boxes because of supply issues - but just to correct, I didn't say 'no knots'. I said no loose knots. Tight knots aren't really a problem.
3
I read a short story from Gutenberg.org  a few months ago regarding the very topic of the OP.  It is a very quick read, a bit silly, and illustrates my earlier comment.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/51533
4
What do you do with crapped,  soured, moldy frames? Share your experience, please! For example, in Ukraine we do it next way.



What to do with crapped frames? What to do if honey is soured in frames? What to do with moldy frames? We will try to answer these questions.

Here are the frames from the weak colonies, which were crapped. These colonies remained alive, but they are very weak. They survived because there was an early flight this year. If the bees made a flight later, these colonies could die. These colonies were crapped because they were weak and ate more and overloaded their intestines.

There is a lot of honey in such frames, but we cannot wash them well. We do not know why the colonies so badly wintered. Maybe they had diseases. Therefore we need to dispose of such frames. Also, you need to dispose of frames from the dead colonies of bees, if you do not know the reasons for their death. Honey from such frames can be cut and given to its cattle. Do not give such honey to bees.
I am recycling such frames so. I lower the frame into a container of boiling water. Honey remains in the container, the wax floats up and we take it out. We cleaned and disinfected the frames so. Do not feel sorry for crapped frames, they cannot be used further because losses during their use may be greater than the loss of recycled frames.

If you are 100% sure that the colony did not die from a disease, but from cold or wear on the brood, then the frames from such colonies can be used further. Do not throw them away, but clean them from bees and use.
What to do with moldy and soured frames?

In the winter and spring, when the bees do not have the ability to fly and empty their intestines, sour honey cannot be given. And at other times such honey can be given to bees.
Here is the honey frame. At the bottom of the frame is mold. How to remove mold? You cannot take it away. You can only slow down the molding process. Shake off honey from open cells and put frames dry on the sun and the wind and then sprinkle them with ashes like this. Put these frames separately from the good frames. You can put it in the unused hive. When the bees gain strength and the time will come to put new frames in the hive, take these frames, shake off the ash (you can do not wash them) and put in the colony. The bees will gnaw the damaged and dried places on the frame and they will build new cells. We need to apply such frames as quickly as possible because the wax moth will appear with the onset of heat and it will begin to eat parts of the frames that are without ashes. If we do not take measures to stop the process of molding the frames, they will rot completely.

In the spring, after reducing the number of frames in the colonies, there will be good, low-honey frames without mold and traces of defecation. We can leave them without handling, because we will use them first when we will be increase the number of frames in the colony. The moth will not appear until the heat, in our locality the wax moth appears in May. Such frames can be placed in the center of the colony's nest. Bees will eat the remains of honey and prepare a frame for laying eggs by the queen. In the center of the nest of the colony you can also put frames full of honey. Bees will eat everything and this will stimulate them to work. Bees do not endure feeding frames in the center of the nest; they will prepare the frame for work as quickly as possible.

That?s all. Thank you! Subscribe on our channel.
5
Most of the world through most of time has had feeding a newborn honey as a ritual with no one noticing any ill effects that were blamed on honey.  For centuries the standard "formula" for a baby when breast milk was not available was milk mixed with honey.  But yes, infants are more susceptible to botulism due to the lack of acidity in their gut while drinking nothing but milk.  The recommendation used to be not to feed them raw food until after six months.  They keep pushing it out with no research to back it up that I've been able to find.

That is interesting. Why would they do that? To be on the safe side I will probably wait until 2.
6
"When you come to a fork in the road.....take it."--Yogi Berra
7
GENERAL BEEKEEPING - MAIN POSTING FORUM. / Re: Queen Bank Question
« Last post by Michael Bush on Today at 04:58:05 PM »
I have set up queen banks.  The bees will rear a new queen despite all those banked queens.  The banked queens aren't laying.  After that new queen has laid up all the space she can find, I catch her and remove her before they get a wild hair and kill those old queens... then the process repeats...
8
>There is some of every US President in Beeblebrox.  Various Prime Ministers and Presidents of other nations, as well.
A well-designed character.

Certainly.  But I was thinking of his brashness and his flamboyance...
9
Most of the world through most of time has had feeding a newborn honey as a ritual with no one noticing any ill effects that were blamed on honey.  For centuries the standard "formula" for a baby when breast milk was not available was milk mixed with honey.  But yes, infants are more susceptible to botulism due to the lack of acidity in their gut while drinking nothing but milk.  The recommendation used to be not to feed them raw food until after six months.  They keep pushing it out with no research to back it up that I've been able to find.
10
THE COFFEE HOUSE ((( SOCIAL - ROOM ))) / Re: Men are getting weaker.
« Last post by herbhome on Today at 04:40:01 PM »
Which proves my point.  Abuse is because of a mental illness not because of a dominant strength.

I agree. Most serious crime I would wager is because of some form of mental illness.

Of course it is. It comes when an individual thinks his/her wants and needs outweigh the wants and needs of others.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10
anything