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Author Topic: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?  (Read 2469 times)

Offline Joe D

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Re: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2016, 12:41:03 AM »
I started to keep bees five and a half years ago and have never treated.  I have had a coupe of hives that absconded, and one that starved(my fault).  Back a couple years ago a neighbor let a commercial bk  put 20 hive on his place and was fixing to put another 20 there.  I saw him at our local bee club and told him his bee were I/2 mile from me.  He asked what I treated with and I told him I have never treated for mites, within a couple of weeks his bees were gone and haven't been back.  Worked great for me.

Good luck to you and your bees


Joe D

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2016, 05:54:43 PM »
I need to tell the commercial Beek that puts his hives right up against my property the same thing. Maybe he will stop putting them on top of me.
Jim
« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 08:56:44 PM by sawdstmakr »
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Oblio13

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Re: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2016, 08:32:39 PM »
>I bought bees from both Kirk Webster and Anarchy Apiaries (Sam Cook) year after year, and year after year I lost them to Varroa.

On natural comb?  Small cell?  Large cell?  I lost all my bees to Varroa everytime on large cell foundation.
Natural comb - I use foundationless frames in eight-frame medium boxes, and a few Warre hives.

Offline Philbee100

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Re: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2017, 02:58:54 AM »
>And catching feral swarms is not feasible.   

I don't see how it's not feasible, but the first step is to get bees that are surviving without treatments.  The feral bees have already taken their losses.  If you don't want to trap them or get on a swarm list or do a cut out then try these for next year:

http://www.fatbeeman.com/bees-honey/
http://www.wolfcreekbees.com/
http://www.goldstarhoneybees.com/shopcontent.asp?type=How%20to%20get%20bees%20for%20your%20Gold%20Star%20top%20bar%20hive
http://anarchyapiaries.org/hivetools/node/32
http://www.enjoybeekeeping.com/

And if they are all sold out you can call or write:
Kirk Webster
Box 381
Middlebury, Vt. 05753
802-989-5895 (no voice mail)

Myron Kropf
2233 LITTLE WOODS RD
BEXAR AR 72515-9509
870-458-3002 (no voice mail)

And there are others.  Likely there are some treatment free beekeepers near you.
In New Zealand all our feral bees are dead due to Varroa.
If all the Beekeepers here went treatment free the industry would be decimated inside two seasons.
As far as Genetics go I cant see how and insect that open mates can be genetically improved?
Or can it?

Online Acebird

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Re: Varroa - to treat, or not to treat ?
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2017, 09:34:19 AM »
As far as Genetics go I cant see how and insect that open mates can be genetically improved?
How did the earth get populated with people when the only form of life was bacteria?
How do you genetically improve a species when you kill off its parasites for them?
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

 

anything