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Author Topic: Growing Garlic  (Read 1880 times)

Offline Rhino86

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Growing Garlic
« on: August 10, 2016, 11:45:19 PM »
I've only planted a few cloves in my time, this winter I planted three cloves over the last few weeks. It is a mild winter here in Queensland Australia. They get morning sun only, which is 24 degree celcuis max and usually 18 - 22 during the day. At night 0-14. I know garlic needs cool weather to grow.
The issue is the green shoots turned to a dying yellow and one plant died.
Is it the heat?
Too much or too little water?
Soil is rich enough, I dont know if ph levels affect garlic

Any advice?

Offline cao

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2016, 02:14:15 AM »
I usually plant mine in the fall and harvest the next spring/summer.

Offline gww

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2016, 11:01:01 AM »
rhino
I agree with cao.  We plant garlic as in the fall and cover with straw.  Seperate the clove to plant.  Cover with straw during winter (the straw may insulate some but mostly keeps the weeds at bay).  In early june (in my area)  the garlic will put a stim in the middle to form a seed pod.  We pull these seed pod stems so that the garlic doesn't have a stem growing down through the clove and you get better cloves. When the green starts turning pretty brown we harvest.  Some hang the garlic but we just cut the stem off and store in weeve baskets that are not air tight.
Hope this helps and good luck
gww

Offline GSF

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2016, 08:21:48 AM »
rhino, If it was too little water then you'd probably see some form of wilting first. Too much water will make it turn colors and die. I'm repeating what's already been posted but I know some folks that wait for the yellow to appear before they harvest. All that being said, I don't grow garlic - on purpose.
When the law no longer protects you from the corrupt, but protects the corrupt from you - then you know your nation is doomed.

Offline gww

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2016, 12:14:51 PM »
I remember when garlic was like $0.75 a clove in the stores.  Back when we first got married and were stuggling pretty good, My wife made and planted a garden with a spade.  She would sell the cloves that were twice the size you could find in the stores for $0.25 a clove.  It was good for a couple of hundred each year.  We have grown garlic every since.  If you have the room, it is easy to grow.  It does take up space during prime growing season.  You can harvest in time to grow a fall crop of something though.  If you straw it well, it is a sit and forget type thing compared to the work involved in all the other garden things we grow.  I am not a big fan of eating garlic but some are and so we grow quite a bit.
Good luck
gww

Offline Rhino86

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2016, 02:19:33 AM »
Thank for the tips, ill add some straw on top. I've only planted three cloves from three varities and could be the one that turned yellow, wiltered then died. The other two are 15cm and 25cm high and doing well.
Garlic is sometime or close too $30 a kilo here and around Brisbane QLD.
I'll plant another glove this week, its mild. If it gets too hot I'll add garden shade mesh as a mini green house.

Offline Rhino86

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2016, 05:23:36 AM »
After more garlic plants withered. I dug them up and found grubs on the roots and in between the forming bulbs.
I am still attempting to identify the grub. It is 4-6mm in length, 2-3mm wide.
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Does any one know if it's a nematodes?
I've placed a lot of coffee on top and watered in, no affect.
If so what controls / kills them?


Offline Acebird

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2016, 09:02:48 AM »
I don't know what that is but it has to be your problem.  It is not a nematode.  You can barely see them.
I have read that you spray milky spore to get rid of grubs.  Keep your garlic watered to reduce grubs.
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Offline Acebird

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 09:11:49 AM »
Rows of garlic, onion, and potatoes.  Easy to grow because most animals won't bother them.

http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/vv333/acebird1/Garden/DSCF7038_zps801df2ab.jpg

I don't use straw anymore because it is expensive and it gets in the way of putting chicken poop on the garden in the winter.  One year I used old hay bales and that just plants a lot of weed seeds.  In the heat of the summer the top surface gets as hard as a brick (a lot of clay) but 3-4 inches down it stays moist.  I plant garlic 4-5 inches deep.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline GSF

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2016, 09:35:13 PM »
Some folks around here will plant a tomato plant in a bale of hay - and it does pretty good to.
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Offline jvalentour

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2016, 12:55:25 PM »
What kinds of garlic are you planting? 
Are you growing for yourself or for sale?

Offline Rhino86

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Re: Growing Garlic
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2016, 10:12:59 PM »
Thank you for the tip on Milky spore.

For myself, as it's $20+ a kilo and mostly imported. It's the common white with a purple tinge from a green grocer.

Instead a hay, I keep lawn clippings and dry them out, add a bit of wood bark or wood mulched. Seems to be working better to keep out the grubs.