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Author Topic: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?  (Read 1580 times)

Offline stung again

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How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« on: January 13, 2017, 01:39:24 PM »
I've got two cutouts to do in Phoenix, and next weeks highs are supposed to be in the mid 60s. Should I wait for warmer weather, or would it be a good time to go for it?

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2017, 07:25:30 PM »
There is more to it the weather the day you do the cutout. When I do cutouts I do not give the bees the honey frames. The reason is that the bees are working so hard at repairing all of the damage that they ignore the SHB. The SHBs roam the hive like they own it and lay eggs everywhere. The bees ignore them for the next 2 to 3 days. I have watched this in my observation hive. Removing the honey helps the bees gain control without loosing the hive. It is still winter with the worst weather ahead of us. You cannot feed them sugar water right now due to adding too much moisture to the hive. You could freeze the honey comb and then give it back after they have repaired the brood but that is risky.
I would wait until spring.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2017, 07:28:08 PM »
Add your location to your profile.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline stung again

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2017, 08:55:11 PM »
It's the wrong time of the year, but the bees have to go, and I would like to save them if possible. It's been cool and raining some here lately but it's not unusual for days to get up in the 70s here in Phx. AZ this time of year. The bees forage a little in the residential areas even in the winter here. At least there is a lot of activity coming and going on warm days. I was hoping to do a cutout and feed what stores they have back to them if possible.

Offline texanbelchers

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2017, 11:08:10 PM »
To answer the question, those temps won't hurt the bees.  Night time temps could be a problem, but if they have to go, then do it.

I'm assuming a langstroth hive frame.  Easy use of other formats may vary.

They won't have tons of brood right now.  Band in what brood you can, put in a small amount of pollen (if they have any), and give them a few frames of empty worker comb.  Watch the comb orientation and keep up up.  Fill the box(es) with your choice of foundation or foundationless frames. Once home, give them an inverted jar of 1:1 sugar water inside the hive to the side away from the brood; put an empty box on top, then close the entrance off.  Make sure they have ventilation, but can't get out.

To the honey..
Freeze ALL of the honey ASAP; you can work it in later.  They will do better in the short term on sugar water because they don't need to protect the jar.

After a couple of days in the freezer, the honey comb will be void of live pests or eggs.  Let a frame worth warm up and band it in a frame.  It will take a relative long time to warm up; don't try to rush it, it will be messy already.  If you have freezer space, band it in frames before you freeze it.  Frozen comb is very difficult to separate; don't ask....

Back to the bees..
Open the entrance after 2 to 3 days.  You can quickly check the water, but try to leave them alone for a few more days.  You can watch the entrance activity if you are home during the day.  You should see some orientation flights and regular foraging flights when it is warm.

If they are still there after a week (they should be, but they are bees), you can take a better look.  The comb should be anchored and the Queen may be laying some new eggs.  Check the condition of the brood you transferred.  Place the room temperature honey frame prepped earlier next to the brood; don't split the brood.  Refill their sugar water and close the hive up for another week.  Watch the entrance activity to learn "normal" behavior.  Poof, you are a beekeeper!  Enjoy. :smile:

Offline stung again

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2017, 12:43:41 PM »
Thanks, I'm going to at least give it a try. It will be a learning experience, and hopefully I can at least take care of some problem bees.

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2017, 05:34:00 PM »
Make sure you are being compensated for your time. There is a good chance that the bees will not make it.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Acebird

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Re: How warm does it need to be to do a cutout?
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2017, 09:49:06 AM »
Jim, I am guessing he is looking at getting experience and an education as his compensation.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it