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Author Topic: The Queen bee not getting attention  (Read 285 times)

Offline davers

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The Queen bee not getting attention
« on: May 15, 2017, 02:41:48 PM »
I had a swarm that I caught from one of my existing hives and after about 4 weeks didn't see any brood so I bought a queen and kept her in the cage just in case there was a virgin queen in the hive that might kill her.  After 3 days, took the cork out to expose the candy.  After 3 more days, she was still in the queen cage.  When I release her, she appeared weak and the bees weren't paying attention to her.  She moved down but not sure what is going on. Any comments?

Offline Captain776

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2017, 04:45:38 AM »
When she has been in there for a week, do a minimal inspection, make room by removing a few frames at either side so you have room to look, pull a few frames in the center Brood area and if u see eggs, Larvae, pupa, put it back together and close it up
Bought my first NUC April 7, 2016.
Like all you when you first started, I am fascinated with beginning Beekeeping and trying to learn all I can.
I retired May 2015 and have added this to my short list of hobbies.

Offline davers

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2017, 05:24:33 PM »
I checked the hive today I didn't see the queen, eggs or larvae.  Its been queen less for weeks. As mentioned before the bees didn't pay any attention to her.  Now do I put another mated queen in or place eggs or young larvae from another hive.  The other hive is 10 miles away.  Would the eggs or larvae survive?

Offline Captain776

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2017, 12:54:41 AM »
Eggs n Larvae should be fine, nurses will keep attending.
If you have easy access to a new Queen, do it, otherwise you will wait at least 4-5 weeks for them to make a new one.
Do you still see uncapped Brood, so they have the option of Supersedure Queen cells?
Bought my first NUC April 7, 2016.
Like all you when you first started, I am fascinated with beginning Beekeeping and trying to learn all I can.
I retired May 2015 and have added this to my short list of hobbies.

Offline Acebird

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2017, 09:11:02 AM »
I don't think you got the queen from the swarm you caught.  By now it is laying worker and IMO not worth keeping.  I would just dump the hive and use the equipment for a split of package.
Brian Cardinal
Just do it

Offline little john

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2017, 10:48:51 AM »
I don't think you got the queen from the swarm you caught.  By now it is laying worker and IMO not worth keeping.  I would just dump the hive and use the equipment for a split of package.

I think the main concern here is re: the mated queen purchased for that swarm ... ?

Davers - Mated Queens are either received by a colony with 'open arms' or with aggression. Usually, it's immediate aggression followed by acceptance after a few days.

What's unusual here is the 'little attention' which was being shown to that Queen.  I've only ever seen a Mated Queen ignored just the once, and a very strange sight it was too - in my case it was a queen purchased at some expense (wouldn't you know ... ?) - and yeh, just try getting a refund.
She was met with total indifference - the support bees in the mailing cage received more interest than she did.  I eventually released her, to 'take her chances', but she was never seen again.  Hardly surprising.

These days, whenever I come across a weird situation, I like to get back to 'known conditions': is there a queen present ?; if so, in which box ?; is she laying ? - and so on.  I don't much like working with the 'maybe there's still a queen in there'-type scenario.

So - what I'd do in your situation is shake those bees out into another box, through a queen excluder, and if that queen is still there, then remove her.
Also - right now I'd check VERY carefully for the presence of eggs of laying workers, as that colony has been without brood for some time.  Murphy's Law says workers will start laying the very day before you introduce your frame of open larvae !

Then - on a nice sunny day - swift a frame of BIAS over to that (now confirmed queenless) colony.  If you can transport it in (say) an expanded polystyrene box, all the better.  Supplying warmth shouldn't be necessary in a warm vehicle on a warm day, but a damp towel or similar inside the box to maintain humidity would certainly be a good idea.
Good luck
LJ
A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping - http://heretics-guide.site90.com

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2017, 12:19:04 PM »
Capt,
From my observations with the bees in the observation hive, my bet is that that queen was not mated. Bees will some what ignore a virgin queen. Bees walk on virgin queens and Virgin queens walk on bees in an undisturbed hive. (This includes normal gentle handling of the frames during inspections.) Not so with a mated queen. Most of the times the mated queen has a retinue around her. Not so with a virgin queen. Talk to the seller.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline Captain776

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Re: The Queen bee not getting attention
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2017, 10:07:48 AM »
My next reading assignment will be getting more info and get a better understanding of Queen cycles and issues.
Bought my first NUC April 7, 2016.
Like all you when you first started, I am fascinated with beginning Beekeeping and trying to learn all I can.
I retired May 2015 and have added this to my short list of hobbies.

 

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