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Author Topic: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?  (Read 10397 times)

Offline dusanmal

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2014, 01:41:10 AM »
Metaphysics is fine, but as a real Physicist I can offer you a theoretical answer that even NASA considers viable, be it beyond our technological abilities. It is called Alcubierre Warp Drive, see short description at NASA site

.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/technology/warp/ideachev.html#alcub

Simplified, if we can somehow create matter with certain unusual properties we can make a space-time bubble around our spaceship, which gives two benefits. First, we could exceed speed of light as seen from outside, because our physical matter ship would experience only an immovable inside of such bubble while bubble itself could propagate as space itself with no limits. Second, as we'd be in that immovable inside, no acceleration of the bubble itself would be felt by us. We could accelerate very fast to faster than light speed, travel ... and, voila, turn, stop, restart... at any bubble speed and acceleration while not feeling any effects inside.
So, you see, aliens in UFOs who would have such faster than light tech to reach us here, could by the same token zip, zig and zag at will ...

Offline Richard M

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2015, 10:53:58 PM »
How do Flying Sausers deal with such G-Force?


Simple answer : They don't.

Offline divemaster1963

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2015, 10:36:54 PM »
Personally I think that with the propulsion system they would use the are producing a field around the craft that wouldblock outside forces. This would off set any outside gravity that is present.

Trekkey first class in mine own mind.( Scotty was the boss)
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Offline herbhome

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2015, 04:45:06 PM »
This is really a huge question when it comes to space travel and light speed. Another concern is the rapid loss of bone density that occurs to all of our astronauts that have spent long periods of time weightless.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #24 on: December 15, 2015, 09:01:29 AM »
>This is really a huge question when it comes to space travel and light speed. Another concern is the rapid loss of bone density that occurs to all of our astronauts that have spent long periods of time weightless.

Well, if you maintain at least one G of forward acceleration for the whole trip the bone loss should be minimal...
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Offline herbhome

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2015, 02:17:24 PM »
So, basically keep moving! :smile:

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2015, 05:36:45 PM »
>So, basically keep moving!

One step up from that.  Keep accelerating...
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Offline Richard M

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2015, 08:45:07 PM »
"The Case for Mars: The Plan to Settle the Red Planet and Why We Must" by Robert Zubrin actually describes a really simple way of providing gravity to whatever strength you desire.

Paraphrasing somewhat, you have a habitat/capsule/call itwhatyouwill atop the third or fourth transmars injection stage of what is essentially an upgunned Saturn 5 type rocket.

The rocket burns to push the spacecraft into a Mars trajectory (or wherever it is you're going)


Once the burn is complete and whole ensemble is on the 6-month coast to Mars, instead of completely jettisoning the stage, it is winched out on a tether as the spacecraft does a small burn to push itself away.




Once the end of the tether is reached or the desired length has been paid out, small thruster rockets are fired on both the spacecraft and the stage, so that they spin about the common axis/centre of gravity. This will impart a G-force/centrifugal force on both the the spacecraft and the stage, the magnitude of which will depend on the radius and speed of rotation, which will depend on the relative mass of the two units.




The stage could still have fuel in it to use at Mars, in which case you could simply winch the two units back together and use thrusters to stop the spin, or if not, simply cut the tether when the spacecraft is correctly positioned with respect to its trajectory.

You can vary the speed of rotation or length of tether to vary the gravity, so pretty simple task to gradually boot it back up from Mars (0.38G) to Earth (1G) on the return trip. That way, everyone hopefully returns with the same bone mass as they set out with.

The thing I like about this solution is that it's simple, elegant and cheap - doesn't require anyone to reinvent the wheel, (because basically, it is a wheel).



Offline Richard M

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2015, 08:52:00 PM »
>This is really a huge question when it comes to space travel and light speed. Another concern is the rapid loss of bone density that occurs to all of our astronauts that have spent long periods of time weightless.

Well, if you maintain at least one G of forward acceleration for the whole trip the bone loss should be minimal...

1G acceleration will get you to 99% of the speed of light in 2 or 3 years. Interesting. You'd need a pretty big petrol tank though.

Offline herbhome

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #29 on: December 19, 2015, 05:32:05 PM »
It's going to take an as yet undeveloped energy source to accomplish this.

Online sawdstmakr

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Re: How do Flying Saucers deal with such G-Force?
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2015, 07:46:25 PM »
In order to stop at the other end, you will need the same amount of fuel to decelerate.
Jim
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